bene orasse est bene studuisse
(To have prayed well is to have pursued well)
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
1 John 1:1-2
1 That which was from the beginning, which we have heard, which we have seen with our eyes, which we have looked upon, and our hands have handled, of the word of life:
2 For the life was manifested: and we have seen, and do bear witness, and declare unto you the life eternal, which was with the Father, and hath appeared to us:Marty Schongauer’s Angel of the Annunciation

1 John 1:1-2

1 That which was from the beginning, which we have heard, which we have seen with our eyes, which we have looked upon, and our hands have handled, of the word of life:

2 For the life was manifested: and we have seen, and do bear witness, and declare unto you the life eternal, which was with the Father, and hath appeared to us:

Marty Schongauer’s Angel of the Annunciation

Reblogged from greluc  14 notes
greluc:

heckyeahpalmarians:

Pope Leo XIII


From “Mirare Caritas” (On the Holy Eucharist)

18. Moreover there is another twofold fruit which we may and must derive from this great Sacrifice. The heart is saddened when it considers what a flood of wickedness, the result - as We have said - of forgetfulness and contempt of the divine Majesty, has inundated the world. It is not too much to say that a great part of the human race seems to be calling down upon itself the anger of heaven; though indeed the crop of evils which has grown up here on earth is already ripening to a just judgment. Here then is a motive whereby the faithful may be stirred to a devout and earnest endeavour to appease God the avenger of sin, and to win from Him the help which is so needful in these calamitous times. And they should see that such blessings are to be sought principally by means of this Sacrifice. For it is only in virtue of the death which Christ suffered that men can satisfy, and that most abundantly, the demands of God’s justice, and can obtain the plenteous gifts of His clemency. And Christ has willed that the whole virtue of His death, alike for expiation and impetration, should abide in the Eucharist, which is no mere empty commemoration thereof, but a true and wonderful though bloodless and mystical renewal of it.

greluc:

heckyeahpalmarians:

Pope Leo XIII

From “Mirare Caritas” (On the Holy Eucharist)

18. Moreover there is another twofold fruit which we may and must derive from this great Sacrifice. The heart is saddened when it considers what a flood of wickedness, the result - as We have said - of forgetfulness and contempt of the divine Majesty, has inundated the world.


It is not too much to say that a great part of the human race seems to be calling down upon itself the anger of heaven; though indeed the crop of evils which has grown up here on earth is already ripening to a just judgment. Here then is a motive whereby the faithful may be stirred to a devout and earnest endeavour to appease God the avenger of sin, and to win from Him the help which is so needful in these calamitous times. And they should see that such blessings are to be sought principally by means of this Sacrifice.


For it is only in virtue of the death which Christ suffered that men can satisfy, and that most abundantly, the demands of God’s justice, and can obtain the plenteous gifts of His clemency. And Christ has willed that the whole virtue of His death, alike for expiation and impetration, should abide in the Eucharist, which is no mere empty commemoration thereof, but a true and wonderful though bloodless and mystical renewal of it.

Reblogged from crookedindifference  1,501 notes
theatlantic:

Lincoln and Darwin Were Both Born On This Date, 205 Years Ago

February 12 was a big day in 1809. Abraham Lincoln was born in a wild Kentucky; Charles Darwin was born in a refined Shrewsbury, Shropshire. One man held together the Union. The other developed a theory that resonates through the sciences and beyond to this day. While it’s often difficult to unspool the impacts that individuals have on the world, it seems fair to say that these two minds did something consequential on this rock. 
And in a 2009 essay, writer Adam Gopnik tried to get at the shared method of their influence.
“The deepest common stuff the two men share, though,” Gopnik says, “is in what they said and wrote—their mastery of a new kind of liberal language.”
“Darwin’s work remains probably the only book that changed science that an amateur can still sit down now and read right through,” he continues. “It’s so well written that we don’t think of it as well written, just as Lincoln’s speeches are so well made that they seem to us as obvious and natural as smooth stones on the beach.
Read more.

theatlantic:

Lincoln and Darwin Were Both Born On This Date, 205 Years Ago

February 12 was a big day in 1809. Abraham Lincoln was born in a wild Kentucky; Charles Darwin was born in a refined Shrewsbury, Shropshire. One man held together the Union. The other developed a theory that resonates through the sciences and beyond to this day. While it’s often difficult to unspool the impacts that individuals have on the world, it seems fair to say that these two minds did something consequential on this rock. 

And in a 2009 essay, writer Adam Gopnik tried to get at the shared method of their influence.

The deepest common stuff the two men share, though,” Gopnik says, “is in what they said and wrote—their mastery of a new kind of liberal language.”

Darwin’s work remains probably the only book that changed science that an amateur can still sit down now and read right through,” he continues. “It’s so well written that we don’t think of it as well written, just as Lincoln’s speeches are so well made that they seem to us as obvious and natural as smooth stones on the beach.

Read more.

Reblogged from sierramussperamus  71 notes
artofthedarkages:

“Alexandria Mosaic”
A city mosaic depicting the Byzantine city of Alexandria in Egypt, a major intellectual and religious center. The city is fortified and abstracted to include only major buildings, particularly churches. The use of depth and perspective is jumbled and flat. Labelled in Greek.
Pieced together with limestone tesserae.
Made in 531 at the Early Byzantine town of Gerasa in Jordan and used as a floor mosaic at the Church of St. John. Currently held at the Jerash Museum.

artofthedarkages:

Alexandria Mosaic

A city mosaic depicting the Byzantine city of Alexandria in Egypt, a major intellectual and religious center. The city is fortified and abstracted to include only major buildings, particularly churches. The use of depth and perspective is jumbled and flat. Labelled in Greek.

Pieced together with limestone tesserae.

Made in 531 at the Early Byzantine town of Gerasa in Jordan and used as a floor mosaic at the Church of St. John. Currently held at the Jerash Museum.